yagazieemezi:

FELA:

“Fela Kuti Music is the Weapon” is a fascinating documentary about the Afrobeat legend, musician, composer, performer and occasional politician. The film mixes footage of Fela Anikulapo Kuti performing at his Shrine nightclub, interviews with the controversial musician, glimpses of life at his not-so-palatial Kalakuta Republic compound, and scenes of Lagos street life. Some voice-over narration gives basic information on Kuti’s musical career and Nigerian politics, but for the most part, the images are left to speak for themselves. Shot in color, it’s an important historical document capturing Kuti in stage and home environments that were most crucial to his life and work.

“Music is a weapon of the future / music is the weapon of the progressives / music is the weapon of the givers of life” Fela Kuti


thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.

The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.